Wednesday, August 20, 2014

SPYMANIA: THE DANAKIL DECEPTION

SPYMANIA: THE DANAKIL DECEPTION!

DAVID FORSTER WRITING AS JAMES HOPWOOD

When archaeologists at the Danakil Depression in Ethiopia – the hottest place on Earth – discover a ruby measuring six feet in diameter, the world's scientific community is thrown into a spin. But it's not only scientists who are interested in the discovery. In the wrong hands, the ruby could be used to power a terrifying weapon – a weapon that could change the fate of the world.

Meet Jarvis Love, the young operative assigned to investigate the find. Thrown into a harsh unforgiving environment, Love finds himself battling a neo-Nazi with a diabolical plot to assassinate the top world leaders in one massive attack...The clock is ticking, and only Love can stop the madman.

Filled with hair-raising action and wild chases, The Danakil Deception is an edge-of-your-seat adventure that harks back to the great spy novels of the sixties, but infused with the high-octane punch of a modern thriller.

The HOTTEST place on Earth just got HOTTER!


Sunday, August 10, 2014

FIGHT CARD UPDATE!

FIGHT CARD UPDATE!

Greetings,

Our Fight Card entry this month comes from Nathan Walpow, author of the popular Joe Portugal mystery series (www.walpow.com).  Fight Card: Push takes us behind the scenes and behind the hoopla of the world of professional wrestling.

FIGHT CARD: PUSH

You’re a ‘jobber’. You make your living by losing in the wrestling ring. You’re a good wrestler, but promoters don’t think you have what it takes to become a superstar. Then Thumper shows up. Big and strong, with a bunny-rabbit gimmick and fans eating out of his hand. His finishing move is called The Thump, and most guys don’t get up from it on their own.

One night, Thumper puts his opponent in the hospital. Not a big deal. Sure, the outcome of a wrestling match is fake. But the ‘bumps’ in the ring can be all too real. Sometimes you get hurt. Part of the territory.

Then it happens again. Only this time, the guy who got ‘thumped’ is tossed into a car like a sack of potatoes. Lou Boone, the promoter who runs Central States Wrestling with an iron fist, knows you saw something and offers you a ‘push’ if you keep your mouth shut.

A push. Every jobber’s dream. To get to win some matches, to get to be on the big cards in the big arenas. You want it more than anything. You begin thinking you imagined the sack-of-potatoes guy – until it happens again.

Now, you have to choose between wrestling fame and doing the right thing. Before this is over, someone else will be dead. And you don’t want it to be you…



We have also recently release or second Fight Card charity anthology, Fight Card Presents: Battling Mahoney and Other Stories, which is available via Amazon as an e-book for $2.99 with 100% of the proceeds going to help the family of the late Jory Sherman. A paperback version will follow shortly.

FIGHT CARD PRESENTS: BATTLING MAHONEY AND OTHER STORIES

The second in a series of charity anthologies from the Fight Card authors’ cooperative – a writers’ community featuring many of today’s finest fictioneers – features fifteen rounds of fight fiction from authors James Reasoner, Loren D. Estleman, Len Levinson, James Hopwood, Mark Finn, Jeremy L. C. Jones, Michael Zimmer, Marc Cameron, Nik Morton, Marsha Ward, Clay More, Chuck Tyrell, Bowie V. Ibarra, Art Bowshier, and featuring an extensive essay, On Boxing, by Willis Gordon. 

Compiled by Paul Bishop and Jeremy L. C. Jones, 100% of the proceeds from these anthologies go directly to an author-in-need or a literacy charity. Words on paper are the life blood of a writer. The writers in this volume were willing to bleed in order to give a transfusion to one of their own – and then continue to bleed to give a transfusion to literacy charities in support of that most precious of commodities...readers. They are true fighters, every one...



Fight Card’s upcoming line-up includes Bareknuckle Barbarian from Teel James Glenn (featuring the two-fisted adventures of Bob Howard – R.E.H.), Job Girl from Jason Chirevas (the sequel to Monster Man), Joseph Grants long awaited The Guns of November, and a new Fight Card Sherlock Holmes tale from Andrew Salmon. 

Until next month … Keep punching …

Wednesday, August 6, 2014

WESTERN PULP: TRAIL JUSTICE!

WESTERN PULP: TRAIL JUSTICE!

NEW SERIES FROM WAYNE D. DUNDEE AND MEL ODOM ... WRITING AS JACK TYREE ...

THE WESTWARD TIDE: TRAIL JUSTICE

In the spring of 1848, the Culbertson-Barkley company, so named for the Illinois and Missouri counties from which most of its members came, heads out for the promise of new beginnings and new lives in the Oregon Territory. 52 wagons, 233 men, women, and children who have been battered by a seemingly endless string of devastating winters and destructive spring floods. Battered maybe, but not defeated. Instead, toughened and filled with a collective iron resolve to change their fate and their future.

But the Oregon Trail is a challenge, even for the toughest and most strong-willed. It starts out hard and gets progressively harder, every inch of the way. It is a foregone conclusion that not everyone who is there at the beginning will make it to the end. It will take men like Wagon Master Eugene Healy, trail scout Basil St. Irons, and former mountain man Elwood Blake to get as many through as possible. And it will take determined women like Ingrid Healy and Evelyn Harmony to nurture and encourage their men in order to help them find the strength and courage to endure.


From within and without, they will be tested. By the elements, by the threat of Indians, by betrayal … and by secrets from the past.



Monday, August 4, 2014

A NEW CASE FOR THE DRIFTER DETECTIVE!

A NEW CASE FOR THE DRIFTER DETECTIVE!

Jack Laramie finds himself in the middle of a rural beauty contest that’s as crooked as a busted fiddle. Things get worse from there, and a chance encounter in the Corpus Christi drunk-tank leads to a new case—on Texas’s dazzling Padre Island.

A big, old mansion full of scheming rich folks, lawyers, and psychics is just the beginning. Jack survives the ‘trip’ of his life, but is his craftiness a match for the privileged upper crust? Dinero Del Mar runs about 24k words, the longest Drifter to date, and features an ending that will forever change the series. Don’t miss it!

Dinero Del Mar is the fifth novella in The Drifter Detective series, following on the heels of Wayne D. Dunde’s Wide Spot in the Road, and Garnett Elliott’s The Girls of Bunker Pines, Hell Up in Houston, and the eponymous debut, The Drifter Detective.


Tuesday, July 29, 2014

AVAILABLE NOW! NEW FIGHT CARD CHARITY ANTHOLOGY!



AVAILABLE NOW! NEW FIGHT CARD CHARITY ANTHOLOGY!

Fight Card is excited to publish our second collection of boxing tales for charity – Fight Card Presents: Battling Mahoney and Other Stories. This time we’ve upped the ante from ten rounds of two-fisted fight fiction to a full fifteen rounds – with 100% of the proceeds going to help the family of western writing legend, the late Jory Sherman – a mentor and friend to so many in the literary community.

Writers helping writers as part of the Fight Card publishing collective.

Battling Mahoney and Other Stories is filled with action delivered by many writers new to the Fight Card ring as well as many of Fight Card’s top contributors. Legendary pulp writer Len Levinson provides the title story – featuring characters from his popular The Sergeant series of WWII thrillers.  Bestselling author James Reasoner provides a brand new short story, Bandera Brawl, featuring his popular western character, Judge Roy Stark, while iconic wordsmith Loren D. Estleman sets fists flying in Flash.

Meanwhile, Fight Card favorite James Hopwood (Fight Card: King of the Outback and Fight Card: Rumble in the Jungle) gives us a Hollywood Hits tale featuring Abbott & Costello along with The Brown Bomber himself, Joe Louis, and Jeremy L. C. Jones checks in with Gator Joe – a two-fisted tale from the tundra.

Robert E. Howard scholar Mark Finn (Fight Card: The Adventures of Sailor Tom Sharkey) gives us another top notch ‘weird boxing’ tale, featuring Sailor Tom Sharkey & the Electric Gorilla. Bowie V. Ibarra returns to the Fight Card team singing The Song of the Cornerman, while Michael Zimmerman gives us one of the hardest hitting stories in the collection, The Broken Man

New writers climbing into the ring with Fight Card also include Nik Morton (Cowboy in the Ring), Marc Cameron (Rock, Paper, Scissors), Marcia Ward (Bloodied Leather), Clay More (Heat of Battle), Chuck Tyrell (Fight Day in Diablo), and Art Bowshire (Mr. Hero), with Willis Gordon’s extensive essay, On Boxing, delivering the collection’s knockout punch.

This new anthology also sports another beautiful cover from Fight Card’s resident artist/illustrator, the brilliant and talented Carl Yonder (Pirate Eye).

It’s all happening in Fight Card Presents: Battling Mahoney and Other Stories

Please help us spread the word and make a difference – a few dollars and a few punches at a time!

FIGHT CARD PRESENTS: BATTLING MAHONEY AND OTHER STORIES

Fight Card Presents: Battling Mahoney and Other Stories is the second in a series of charity anthologies from the Fight Card authors’ cooperative – a writers’ community featuring many of today’s finest fictioneers, including James Reasoner, Loren D. Estleman, Len Levinson, James Hopwood, Mark Finn, Jeremy L. C. Jones, Michael Zimmer, Marc Cameron, Nik Morton, Marsha Ward, Clay More, Chuck Tyrell, Bowie V. Ibarra, Art Bowshire, and featuring an extensive essay, On Boxing, by Willis Gordon.

Compiled by Paul Bishop and Jeremy L. C. Jones, 100% of the proceeds from these anthologies go directly to an author-in-need or a literacy charity. Words on paper are the life blood of a writer. The writers in this volume were willing to bleed in order to give a transfusion to one of their own – and then continue to bleed to give a transfusion to literacy charities in support of that most precious of commodities...readers. They are true fighters, every one... 
 

Sunday, July 27, 2014

LEE GOLDBERG EXPLAINES IT ALL!

LEE GOLDBERG EXPLAINES IT ALL (WITH APOLOGIES TO CLARISSA)!

My writing buddy and mentor Lee Goldberg has risen to great heights with not only in his television writing career and with his Diagnosis Murder and Monk series, but has recently stormed the bestseller list with his new Fox and O'Hare series (written with Janet Evonovich).

Always the brilliant entrepreneur, Lee is also one of the founders of the newly minted Brash Books imprint (bringing back a wonderful mix of retro mysteries, which have been out-of-print far too long).  He has also produced a series of short videos (links below) about his books and his writing process...

The Story Behind WATCH ME DIE
 

The Story Behind McGRAVE
 

The Story Behind FAST TRACK
 

 

 

 

 
 
 
Check them out.  I think you'll find them both entertaining and enlightening ...

Friday, July 25, 2014

PUSHING AND SHOVING!

PUSHING AND SHOVING!

NATHAN WALPOW ON WRITING FIGHT CARD: PUSH

I’ve been an on-again-off-again wrestling fan since I was a teenager. There was a period in the ’60s when my father and I watched the WWWF on TV every week. Those were the days of Bruno Sammartino and Bobo Brazil and Killer Kowalski, when no one but the hillbillies wore anything but wrestling tights. I picked it up again in the late ’80s and early to mid-’90s, the days of Hulk Hogan and Randy Savage and Rowdy Roddy Piper. By the end of this period, many of the wrestlers had wacky costumes and there were gimmicks galore. The WWWF had turned into the WWF, and there was more of a circus atmosphere, and it had taken another step away from any pretense of reality.

Even today, when I run across a card on TV (it’s the WWE now), more often than not I stop channel hopping to see what’s going on. I don’t know much about anybody but the Undertaker, but I still enjoy the whole soap opera, the turns to and from the dark side, the magnitude of the mythology they’ve built. And that some things never change – for instance, the referees are as clueless as ever.

Shortly before the turn of the century, I saw a call for submissions for an anthology of wrestling-related horror stories. I kicked out a story called Push Comes to Shove, which involved a jobber – a guy who’s there solely to lose to a current or upcoming superstar – running across a new wrestler who was making stuff a little more real than it should have been. By the time I got around to sending the story in, the market was already closed. I tried to place it a couple more times, but, as is customary with my writing, it was a little too much this and not enough that for most markets, and I packed it away in my electronic trunk.

Not long after, my local Sisters in Crime chapter put out a call for stories for a book of members’ work. I dusted off Push Comes to Shove and discovered it consisted of four thousand words of good story and a thousand of darlings to be killed. I made the cuts and the editors liked what was left. The book came out in 2000, published by Ugly Town, the Los Angeles small press that later published my third and fourth Joe Portugal novels.

One day, I came back from some mystery convention or other and discovered an email from Otto Penzler, the overall editor of the Best American Mystery Stories series. He’d included Push Comes to Shove in the first cut of the 2001 edition, and that year’s editor selected it for the book. This was none other than Lawrence Block, one of my favorite crime fiction authors. So, not long afterward, there I was on the bookstore shelves, in a volume with Joyce Carol Oates.

That was it for a while, and then I ran into Paul Bishop at an event for Stark Raving Press, a new electronic publishing company for whom we were both writing novellas. We’d worked together in the local Mystery Writers of America chapter some years earlier, but I hadn’t seen him in quite a while. He told me about Fight Card, with its preponderance of boxing novellas, but with mixed martial arts and luchadors on the way. Wheels spun in my head, but only for a moment, and I blurted out, “I’ve got this wrestling story, blah, blah, blah, what if I expanded it into a novella?”

Paul said send him the story, and I did, and he liked it, and expansion began. I had the luxury of filling in more of the unnamed protagonist’s backstory, his life with his girlfriend, his training, what he did during the long hours between matches at TV tapings. I added an ex-wrestler uncle and a stint in Iraq and a dash of PTSD. I added some dimension to the bad guy. I was able to make my hero more proactive and less simply carried along by events. The whole thing took a week of writing time…it was one of those stories that, to use the old cliché, wrote itself, as if it had always wanted to grow and flourish.

I decided to shorten the title to simply The Push, then further cut it to Push. It seemed to work better with both the length and with the Fight Card gestalt – plus the longer title remains forever reserved for the short story that got the first (and still, let’s face it, the only) recognition any of my work has received.

One reason I'm fond of this tale is its protagonist is very different from the urban neurotics who usually populate my work. He’s smart enough, but he’s basically a simple guy with a simple life and a simple loyalty to those he loves. Just a guy faced with a big problem while trying to do his job.

When I wrote Push Comes to Shove, I thought Thumper’s costume and persona might be a little over the top, but subsequent developments in the WWF proved me wrong. And though they’ve dialed back on the weirdness a little since then, I like to think  Thumper’s Central States Wrestling career would have made him a natural fit for later WWWF/WWF/WWE greatness, if only…but that would be telling.

FIGHT CARD: PUSH

You’re a jobber. You make your living by losing in the wrestling ring. You’re a good wrestler, but promoters don’t think you have what it takes to become a superstar. Then Thumper shows up. Big and strong, with a bunny-rabbit gimmick and fans eating out of his hand. His finishing move is called The Thump, and most guys don’t get up from it on their own.

One night, Thumper puts his opponent in the hospital. Not a big deal. Sure, the outcome of a wrestling match is fake. But the bumps in the ring can be all too real. Sometimes you get hurt. Part of the territory.

Then it happens again. Only this time, the guy who got ‘thumped’ is tossed into a car like a sack of potatoes. Lou Boone, the promoter who runs Central States Wrestling with an iron fist, knows you saw something and offers you a push if you keep your mouth shut.

A push. Every jobber’s dream. To get to win some matches, to get to be on the big cards in the big arenas. You want it more than anything. You begin thinking you imagined the sack-of-potatoes guy – until it happens again.

Now, you have to choose between wrestling fame and doing the right thing. Before this is over, someone else will be dead. And you don’t want it to be you…
Based on the short story Push Comes to Shove, selected by Lawrence Block for the Best American Mystery Stories series.